Is “Sleeping In” a Bad Thing?

Many people spend the work week anticipating the extra sleep they will get on the weekend (or whenever their days off may fall). It can be a truly relaxing feeling where you don’t have to wake up to an alarm the next day. But can this be bad for your sleep?

While it is generally recommended by sleep experts that you go to sleep and wake up at the same time each day, there is really nothing wrong with sleeping a little longer every now and then, as long as you are smart about it.

How do you sleep on work nights?

Many people who sleep in on their days off may not realize that the extra few hours of sleep they are getting is actually to make up for the poor sleep they are probably getting on the other nights of the week. While an hour or two of extra sleep on your weekends is usually fine, sleeping in for as much as several hours is not necessarily a good thing.

Pay attention to how you are sleeping on work nights. Are you staying up late when you have to wake up early? Do you feel tired during the daytime? If so then you may need to make a few adjustments to your bedtime during your work week. Your body is probably desperate to catch up on some much-needed sleep once the weekend rolls around. 

Tips for maintaining a consistent sleep

Make sure you are getting enough sleep every night, even on work nights, so that you are well rested, alert and ready for the day ahead. The average adult requires around 7-9 hours of sleep per night so if you are getting less than this, consider slowly moving your bedtime up a little earlier. Of course, life will happen every now and then, and there may be a few unplanned late nights that may interrupt your sleep cycle but it is important to get back on track!

All that to say, there is nothing wrong with sleeping for an extra hour or two if you don’t have to wake up early and enjoy that extra sleep! Just be smart about it and make sure your sleep is not suffering on the other nights of the week.

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